Home / Longhorn Beetles (Cerambycidae) / Black and Yellow Longhorn (Rutpela maculata)

Black and Yellow Longhorn (Rutpela maculata)

Black and yellow longhorn beetle is a part of the flower longhorn (Cerambycidae) family and lepturine beetle (Lepturinae) subfamily. They are found in almost all of Europe, attaining their name due to the black and yellow spotted appearance.

Black and Yellow Longhorn Beetle

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Cerambycidae
  • Genus: Rutpela
  • Scientific name: Rutpela maculata

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size:  13 – 20 mm (0.51 – 0.79 inches)

Color: They have a dark brown head and pronotum and yellowish elytra marked with black stripes and dots all over. Their front legs are yellow, tipped in black, while the hind legs mostly remain black.

Other Characteristic Features: One of their most striking features is their long antennae, which is quite characteristic of the majority of the longhorn beetle species.

Spotted Longhorn

Larva

The larva with a pale appearance mostly dwells in the rotten woods.

Black and Yellow Longhorn Beetle Larvae

Pupa

Like most other longhorn beetle pupae, the pupa for this species remains in the sapwood’s pupal chambers until it matures as an adult. 

Egg

The eggs, small and round, are mostly laid in the sapwood of the rotten stumps.

Quick Facts

Other NamesSpotted longhorn
LifespanApproximately 2 – 4 weeks
DistributionMajor parts of Europe including France, Greece, Germany, Denmark, Czech Republic, Finland, Poland, United Kingdom, Switzerland
HabitatLarvae: Mostly rotten woods of deciduous trees, which is their primary food source
Adults: Near Apiaceae species and hawthorn flowers
Common PredatorsBirds
Seasons active fromMay-August
Host PlantsLarvae: Norway spruce, European beech, common hazel, willows
Adults: Hawthorn and Apiaceae species
Diet  of larvae and adultsLarvae: Dying or rotten wood of the trees they live in Adults: Nectar and pollen of their host plants
Rutpela maculata

Identifying The Damage Caused By Them

The larva seems to dig a lot and make holes in the wood, causing damage to the trees or even untreated lumbers.

Did You Know

  • The black and yellow color pattern makes these beetles replicate wasps, keeping them a little safe from their predators, particularly birds.
  • This species has about 13 varieties, some of them being Rutpela maculata var. calcarata, Rutpela maculata var. subspinosa, Rutpela maculata var. sinuate, and Rutpela maculata var. subundulata.
Black and Yellow Spotted Longhorn Beetle

Image Source: warehouse1.indicia.org.uk, i.pinimg.com, inpn.mnhn.fr, alanwatermanphotos.files.wordpress.com, adriancolston.files.wordpress.com

Black and yellow longhorn beetle is a part of the flower longhorn (Cerambycidae) family and lepturine beetle (Lepturinae) subfamily. They are found in almost all of Europe, attaining their name due to the black and yellow spotted appearance.

Black and Yellow Longhorn Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size:  13 – 20 mm (0.51 – 0.79 inches)

Color: They have a dark brown head and pronotum and yellowish elytra marked with black stripes and dots all over. Their front legs are yellow, tipped in black, while the hind legs mostly remain black.

Other Characteristic Features: One of their most striking features is their long antennae, which is quite characteristic of the majority of the longhorn beetle species.

Spotted Longhorn

Larva

The larva with a pale appearance mostly dwells in the rotten woods.

Black and Yellow Longhorn Beetle Larvae

Pupa

Like most other longhorn beetle pupae, the pupa for this species remains in the sapwood’s pupal chambers until it matures as an adult. 

Egg

The eggs, small and round, are mostly laid in the sapwood of the rotten stumps.

Quick Facts

Other NamesSpotted longhorn
LifespanApproximately 2 – 4 weeks
DistributionMajor parts of Europe including France, Greece, Germany, Denmark, Czech Republic, Finland, Poland, United Kingdom, Switzerland
HabitatLarvae: Mostly rotten woods of deciduous trees, which is their primary food source
Adults: Near Apiaceae species and hawthorn flowers
Common PredatorsBirds
Seasons active fromMay-August
Host PlantsLarvae: Norway spruce, European beech, common hazel, willows
Adults: Hawthorn and Apiaceae species
Diet  of larvae and adultsLarvae: Dying or rotten wood of the trees they live in Adults: Nectar and pollen of their host plants
Rutpela maculata

Identifying The Damage Caused By Them

The larva seems to dig a lot and make holes in the wood, causing damage to the trees or even untreated lumbers.

Did You Know

  • The black and yellow color pattern makes these beetles replicate wasps, keeping them a little safe from their predators, particularly birds.
  • This species has about 13 varieties, some of them being Rutpela maculata var. calcarata, Rutpela maculata var. subspinosa, Rutpela maculata var. sinuate, and Rutpela maculata var. subundulata.
Black and Yellow Spotted Longhorn Beetle

Image Source: warehouse1.indicia.org.uk, i.pinimg.com, inpn.mnhn.fr, alanwatermanphotos.files.wordpress.com, adriancolston.files.wordpress.com

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