Scarab Beetles (Scarabaeidae)

Scarab beetles are a family of over 30,000 beetles found throughout the world. French entomologist Pierre André Latreille first described them in 1802.

Common Beetles Belonging to this Family

Scientific Classification

This family of beetles is divided into several subfamilies and various genera.

Subfamilies

  • Aclopinae
  • Aegialiinae
  • Allidiostomatinae
  • Aphodiinae
  • Aulonocneminae
  • Cetoniinae
  • Chironinae
  • Dynamopodinae
  • Dynastinae
  • Eremazinae
  • Melolonthinae
  • Orphninae
  • Phaenomeridinae
  • Rutelinae
  • Scarabaeinae
  • Termitotroginae
  • Cretoscarabaeinae
  • Lithoscarabaeinae
  • Prototroginae

Genera

  • Acanthonitis
  • Acoma
  • Actinophorus
  • Aegialia
  • Aeschrotes
  • Afrocanthon
  • Afroharoldius
  • Agamopus
  • Aganhyboma
  • Agestrata
  • Aidophus
  • Aleiantus
  • Allonitis
  • Altonthophagus
  • Amaecylius
  • Amblonoxia
  • Amphiceratodon
  • Amphimallon
  • Amphionthophagus
  • Amphistomus
  • Ancognatha
  • Anisocanthon
  • Annegialia
  • Anomalacra
  • Anomala
  • Anomiopsis
  • Anomiopsoides
  • Anonthobium
  • Anonychonitis
  • Anoplodrepanus
  • Anoplognatho
  • Aphengium
  • Aphengoecus
  • Aphodius
  • Aphonus
  • Aphotaenius
  • Apotolamprus
  • Aptenocanthon
  • Aptychonitis
  • Archophileurus
  • Arrowianella
  • Ataeniopsis
  • Ataenius
  • Ateuchus
  • Atrichius
  • Augosoma
  • Aulacium
  • Aulacopris
  • Australaphodius
  • Baloghonthobium
  • Bdelyropsis
  • Bdelyrus
  • Bohepilissus
  • Bolbites
  • Boletoscapter
  • Boreocanthon
  • Boucomontius
  • Byrrhidium
  • Caccobiomorphus
  • Caccocnemus
  • Caccophilus
  • Caeconthobium
  • Caelius
  • Caelontherus
  • Calhyboma
  • Callistethus
  • Cambefortantus
  • Canthidium
  • Canthochilum
  • Canthodimorpha
  • Canthonella
  • Canthonidia
  • Canthonosoma
  • Canthon
  • Canthotrypes
  • Cartwrightia
  • Catharsiocopris
  • Cephalodesmius
  • Cetonia
  • Chalcocopris
  • Chalconotus
  • Chalcosoma
  • Cheirolasia
  • Cheirotonus
  • Chironitis
  • Chlorixanthe
  • Chnaunanthus
  • Chrysina
  • Coenonycha
  • Colobonthophagus
  • Copridaspidus
  • Copris
  • Coprobius
  • Coprocanthon
  • Coprophanaeoides
  • Coprophanaeus
  • Coptorrhina
  • Coscinocephalus
  • Cotalpa
  • Cotinis
  • Cremastocheilus
  • Cryptocanthon
  • Cyclocephala
  • Cyptochirus
  • Deltepilissus
  • Deltochilum
  • Deltohyboma
  • Demarziella
  • Dendropaemon
  • Deronitis
  • Diaglyptus
  • Dialytellus
  • Dialytes
  • Diapterna
  • Diasomus
  • Dichelonyx
  • Dichotomius
  • Digitonthophagus
  • Dinacoma
  • Diorygopyx
  • Diplotaxis
  • Drepanocerus
  • Drepanoplatynus
  • Dynastes
  • Dyscinetus
  • Elassocanthon
  • Endrodius
  • Endroedyantus
  • Enicotarsus
  • Ennearabdus
  • Epactoides
  • Epilissus
  • Epionitis
  • Epirinus
  • Eremonthophagus
  • Eucanthidium
  • Eucranium
  • Eudicella
  • Eudinopus
  • Euetheola
  • Euhyboma
  • Euoniticellus
  • Euparia
  • Euparixia
  • Euphoria
  • Eurypodea
  • Eurysternodes
  • Eutrichillum
  • Falsignambia
  • Formicdubius
  • Fossocarus
  • Francmonrosia
  • Frankenbergerius
  • Freyus
  • Furconthophagus
  • Genuchinus
  • Geopsammodius
  • Gibbonthophagus
  • Gilletellus
  • Glaphyocanthon
  • Glaphyrocanthon
  • Glyphoderus
  • Gnorimella
  • Goliathus
  • Goniocanthon
  • Gromphas
  • Gronocarus
  • Gymnetina
  • Gymnetis
  • Gymnopyge
  • Hammondantus
  • Haroldiataenius
  • Hemiphileurus
  • Hologymnetis
  • Hoplia
  • Hornietus
  • Hypothyce
  • Hypotrichia
  • Isonychus
  • Leiopsammodius
  • Leptohoplia
  • Liatongus
  • Lissomelas
  • Macrodactylus
  • Maladera
  • Malagoniella
  • Martineziana
  • Mecynorhina
  • Megasoma
  • Melanocanthon
  • Micraegialia
  • Mnematidium
  • Mnematium
  • Monoplistes
  • Neateuchus
  • Neocanthidium
  • Neonitis
  • Neopachysoma
  • Neopsammodius
  • Nesocanthon
  • Nesosisyphus
  • Nesovinsonia
  • Nipponoserica
  • Notiophanaeus
  • Notopedaria
  • Nudipleurus
  • Odontolytes
  • Odontopsammodius
  • Oncerus
  • Onitis
  • Ontherus
  • Onthoecus
  • Onthocharis
  • Onthophagiellus
  • Onthophagus
  • Orizabus
  • Osmoderma
  • Oxygrylius
  • Oxyomus
  • Pachnoda
  • Parabyrsopolis
  • Paracotalpa
  • Parapsammodius
  • Parastasia
  • Parataenius
  • Pelidnota
  • Phanaeus
  • Phileurus
  • Phobetus
  • Phyllophaga
  • Platytomus
  • Plectris
  • Plectrodes
  • Pleurophorus
  • Podolasia
  • Podostena
  • Polyphylla
  • Popillia
  • Protaetia
  • Psammodius
  • Pseudataenius
  • Pseudocanthon
  • Pseudocotalpa
  • Pseudotorynorrhina
  • Psilocnemis
  • Rhysothorax
  • Rhyssemus
  • Rutela
  • Scarabaeus
  • Serica
  • Stephanorrhina
  • Strategus
  • Strigoderma
  • Taurhina
  • Tesarius
  • Thyce
  • Tomarus
  • Trichiorhyssemus
  • Trichiotinus
  • Trigonopeltastes
  • Valgus
  • Warwickia
  • Xeropsamobeus
  • Xyloryctes
  • Xylotrupes


Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 0.15-1.6 cm

Color:They are primarily black or brown, with a metallic sheen.

Other Characteristic Features: They are stout and oval-shaped, with club-like antennae. These antennae are made up of plates which can be curled into a ball or flattened out like leaves to sense odours.

Larva

The grubs are white or pale yellow and C-shaped.

Pupa

Once they mature, the larvae tunnel deep underground to pupate.

Egg

The eggs are laid in decaying flesh, carrion, or dung.

Quick Facts

Lifespan 13-44 days
Distribution Worldwide, except Antarctica
Habitat Deserts, forests, and grasslands
Predators Bats, birds, frogs, and reptiles
Seasons active Not recorded
Diet of adults Dung, hummus, decaying plant material

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

Some scarabs can act as pests to certain plants but are not very threatening.

Did You Know

  • Ancient Egyptians held the sacred scarab beetle (Scarabaeus sacer) with great regard, with amulets resembling them being created throughout the Mediterranean.

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