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Titan Beetle (Titanus giganteus)

The titan beetle is a member of the family of longhorn beetles and is one of the largest beetles in the world. The largest, reliably-recorded specimen was found to be 16.7 cm (6.6 in) long. Swedish zoologist Carl Linnaeus first described this species in 1771.

Titan Beetle

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Cerambycidae
  • Genus: Titanus
  • Scientific name: Titanus giganteus

Physical Description and Identification

Adult 

Size: 13.97 cm (5.5 cm)

Color: They are brown

Other Characteristic Features: The jaws of these beetles are extremely strong, capable of snapping a pencil in two or cutting human flesh.

Titanus giganteus

Larva

The larvae of these beetles have never been spotted, so very little information about them is known. Since they feed on wood, certain species found within the boreholes were assumed to be the titan beetle larva, estimated to measure 30 cm and 5 cm in length and width.

Titan Beetle Larvae

Pupa

Once mature, the larvae begin to pupate underground. The adults live for a short span upon emerging from the pupa, dying right after mating.

Egg

Females lay eggs close to the host plant.

Quick Facts

LifespanShort but exact not recorded
DistributionDifferent parts of South America, mainly the rainforests of north-central Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, the Guianas, Peru, and Venezuela.
HabitatRainforests
Seasons activeNot recorded
Host plantsWood from indigenous plants
Diet of adultsDoes not feed
The Titan Beetle

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

Boreholes two inches wide and one foot long are assumed to be caused by titan beetle larvae. 

Did You Know

  • A life-size picture of what was believed to be the titan beetle’s larva was published by National Geographic in 1959. However, it would turn out to be a different beetle, possibly a sabertooth longhorn beetle.
  • While not particularly aggressive, adults will hiss and bite if disturbed.
Titan Beetle Picture

Image Source: allthingspestremoval.com, live.staticflickr.com, i.pinimg.com, nhm.ac.uk,

The titan beetle is a member of the family of longhorn beetles and is one of the largest beetles in the world. The largest, reliably-recorded specimen was found to be 16.7 cm (6.6 in) long. Swedish zoologist Carl Linnaeus first described this species in 1771.

Titan Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adult 

Size: 13.97 cm (5.5 cm)

Color: They are brown

Other Characteristic Features: The jaws of these beetles are extremely strong, capable of snapping a pencil in two or cutting human flesh.

Titanus giganteus

Larva

The larvae of these beetles have never been spotted, so very little information about them is known. Since they feed on wood, certain species found within the boreholes were assumed to be the titan beetle larva, estimated to measure 30 cm and 5 cm in length and width.

Titan Beetle Larvae

Pupa

Once mature, the larvae begin to pupate underground. The adults live for a short span upon emerging from the pupa, dying right after mating.

Egg

Females lay eggs close to the host plant.

Quick Facts

LifespanShort but exact not recorded
DistributionDifferent parts of South America, mainly the rainforests of north-central Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, the Guianas, Peru, and Venezuela.
HabitatRainforests
Seasons activeNot recorded
Host plantsWood from indigenous plants
Diet of adultsDoes not feed
The Titan Beetle

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

Boreholes two inches wide and one foot long are assumed to be caused by titan beetle larvae. 

Did You Know

  • A life-size picture of what was believed to be the titan beetle’s larva was published by National Geographic in 1959. However, it would turn out to be a different beetle, possibly a sabertooth longhorn beetle.
  • While not particularly aggressive, adults will hiss and bite if disturbed.
Titan Beetle Picture

Image Source: allthingspestremoval.com, live.staticflickr.com, i.pinimg.com, nhm.ac.uk,

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