Home / Ladybird Beetles (Ladybug/Coccinellidae) / Squash Lady Beetle (Epilachna borealis)

Squash Lady Beetle (Epilachna borealis)

Squash lady beetle of the ladybird beetles family is indigenous to the eastern parts of the United States. They mostly feed on squash alongside other plants belonging to the same family, hence the name.

Squash Lady Beetle

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Coccinellidae
  • Genus: Epilachna
  • Scientific name: Epilachna borealis

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: 7 – 10 mm (0.27 – 0.39 inches)

Color: They have a yellow body with black spots on their wing covers and elytra.

Other Characteristic Features: These beetles appear big with a dome-shaped body and spotted appearance.

Epilachna borealis

Larva

They have a yellow body with black hair all over. The squash lady beetle larvae are known to feed on the undersides of the leaves of squash and other plants, causing significant damage to them.

Squash Lady Beetle Larvae

Eggs

The small-sized eggs appear yellow, laid in clusters on the surfaces of their host plants’ leaves.

Squash Lady Beetle Eggs

Quick Facts

Adult lifespanApproximately 2 – 6 months
Duration of larval stageAbout ten days
DistributionEastern United States
HabitatGrasslands and areas around squash and pumpkin plantations
Common PredatorsBirds
Seasons active fromNot recorded
Host PlantsSquash, pumpkin, zucchini, gourd
Diet of larvae and adults Leaves of their host plants

Identifying Damage Caused by Them

The larvae and adults mostly feed on the leaves’ undersides, making circular holes, and skeletonizing them to a great extent, leaving behind just the thin veins. The adult beetles even eat the squash or pumpkin’s rinds, causing immense damage to the vegetable.

Clearing the egg masses from the plants, and spraying insecticides are some of the many ways in which one can get rid of the larvae and adult beetle. 

Squash Lady Beetle Damage

Did You Know

  • They often have a similarity with the cucumber beetle. However, there is a difference in the shape of their body, with the latter appearing flat.
Lady Squash Beetle

Image Source: bugguide.net, objects.liquidweb.services, cdn.whatsthatbug.com, static.inaturalist.org, i.ytimg.com, lh3.googleusercontent.com,

Squash lady beetle of the ladybird beetles family is indigenous to the eastern parts of the United States. They mostly feed on squash alongside other plants belonging to the same family, hence the name.

Squash Lady Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adults

Size: 7 – 10 mm (0.27 – 0.39 inches)

Color: They have a yellow body with black spots on their wing covers and elytra.

Other Characteristic Features: These beetles appear big with a dome-shaped body and spotted appearance.

Epilachna borealis

Larva

They have a yellow body with black hair all over. The squash lady beetle larvae are known to feed on the undersides of the leaves of squash and other plants, causing significant damage to them.

Squash Lady Beetle Larvae

Eggs

The small-sized eggs appear yellow, laid in clusters on the surfaces of their host plants’ leaves.

Squash Lady Beetle Eggs

Quick Facts

Adult lifespanApproximately 2 – 6 months
Duration of larval stageAbout ten days
DistributionEastern United States
HabitatGrasslands and areas around squash and pumpkin plantations
Common PredatorsBirds
Seasons active fromNot recorded
Host PlantsSquash, pumpkin, zucchini, gourd
Diet of larvae and adults Leaves of their host plants

Identifying Damage Caused by Them

The larvae and adults mostly feed on the leaves’ undersides, making circular holes, and skeletonizing them to a great extent, leaving behind just the thin veins. The adult beetles even eat the squash or pumpkin’s rinds, causing immense damage to the vegetable.

Clearing the egg masses from the plants, and spraying insecticides are some of the many ways in which one can get rid of the larvae and adult beetle. 

Squash Lady Beetle Damage

Did You Know

  • They often have a similarity with the cucumber beetle. However, there is a difference in the shape of their body, with the latter appearing flat.
Lady Squash Beetle

Image Source: bugguide.net, objects.liquidweb.services, cdn.whatsthatbug.com, static.inaturalist.org, i.ytimg.com, lh3.googleusercontent.com,

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