Harmonia Beetle (Harmonia)

Harmonia beetles are a genus of beetles belonging to the family of lady beetles. They provide a beneficial role by preying upon aphids and mites, keeping plants affected by them safe from disease.

Harmonia Beetle

List of Species Belonging to this Genus

  • Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis)
  • Antipodean Ladybird (Harmonia antipodum)
  • Harmonia basinotata 
  • Harmonia bicolor 
  • Common Spotted Lady Beetle (Harmonia conformis)  
  • Harmonia dimidiata 
  • Harmonia dunlopi 
  • Harmonia eucharis 
  • Harmonia expallida 
  • Harmonia octomaculata 
  • Cream Streaked Lady Beetle (Harmonia quadripunctata) 
  • Harmonia sedecimnotata 
  • Tortoise Shelled Ladybird (Harmonia testudinaria) 
  • Harmonia uninotata 
  • Harmonia yedoensis 

Physical Description and Identification

Adult 

Size: 0.118-0.275 in (0.3-0.7 cm)

Color: Their elytra are red to orange with black spots. These patches are sometimes linked with black bars.

Other Characteristic Features: The antennae consist of eleven segments and is overall smaller than the beetle’s head. The last three segments are thickened at the tip, forming a club-like shape. The rear end of their thoracic shield is slightly curved.

Harmonia Beetle Picture

Larva

These larvae are generally black or grey, with some blue, orange, or yellow spots. They are elongated grubs with prominent legs and a pointed rear. In certain species, such as the Asian lady beetle, fleshy protrusions extend from both sides.

Harmonia Beetle Larva

Pupa

The pupae are dark orange or red, with spots. They are round and attached to a surface. Though it remains fixed to this surface, if disturbed, it may twitch. Pupation takes place inside the larval skin of the last instar. During summer, the pupa develops in around 5-8 days.

Harmonia Beetle Pupa

Egg

Their eggs are distinct from most other insect eggs, except for a few leaf beetle species. They typically are yellowish or orange-red and shaped like spindles. But before hatching, the eggs take on a grey color. Generally, these beetles’ eggs are laid in clusters on the leaves of the preferred host plant.  

Harmonia Beetle Eggs

Quick Facts

Lifespan1-3 months
DistributionNative: Asia, including Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Indonesia, India, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan; Australasia, including Australia, Micronesia, New Guinea, and New Zealand; Europe Invasive: America and parts of Europe
HabitatAgrarian land, cities, gardens, and fields
PredatorsSpiders, some birds
Seasons activeYear-round
Host PlantsAny suitable plant with green leaves
Diet of adultsMainly aphids, but also other insects and their larvae and eggs. Sometimes their diets are supplemented with pollen, nectar, and fruit

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

The harmonia beetles cause no identifiable damage. On the contrary, by preying upon aphids and other insects, they keep plants safe.

Harmonia Beetle Image

Did You Know

  • Sometimes these beetles are sold as biological pest control; however, they tend to not remain in one location for very long. An alternative has been to attract them by keeping plants that provide pollen and nectar.

Image Source: static.inaturalist.org, live.staticflickr.com, americaninsects.net, i.pinimg.com, bugguide.net, nathistoc.bio.uci.edu

Harmonia beetles are a genus of beetles belonging to the family of lady beetles. They provide a beneficial role by preying upon aphids and mites, keeping plants affected by them safe from disease.

Harmonia Beetle

List of Species Belonging to this Genus

  • Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis)
  • Antipodean Ladybird (Harmonia antipodum)
  • Harmonia basinotata 
  • Harmonia bicolor 
  • Common Spotted Lady Beetle (Harmonia conformis)  
  • Harmonia dimidiata 
  • Harmonia dunlopi 
  • Harmonia eucharis 
  • Harmonia expallida 
  • Harmonia octomaculata 
  • Cream Streaked Lady Beetle (Harmonia quadripunctata) 
  • Harmonia sedecimnotata 
  • Tortoise Shelled Ladybird (Harmonia testudinaria) 
  • Harmonia uninotata 
  • Harmonia yedoensis 

Physical Description and Identification

Adult 

Size: 0.118-0.275 in (0.3-0.7 cm)

Color: Their elytra are red to orange with black spots. These patches are sometimes linked with black bars.

Other Characteristic Features: The antennae consist of eleven segments and is overall smaller than the beetle’s head. The last three segments are thickened at the tip, forming a club-like shape. The rear end of their thoracic shield is slightly curved.

Harmonia Beetle Picture

Larva

These larvae are generally black or grey, with some blue, orange, or yellow spots. They are elongated grubs with prominent legs and a pointed rear. In certain species, such as the Asian lady beetle, fleshy protrusions extend from both sides.

Harmonia Beetle Larva

Pupa

The pupae are dark orange or red, with spots. They are round and attached to a surface. Though it remains fixed to this surface, if disturbed, it may twitch. Pupation takes place inside the larval skin of the last instar. During summer, the pupa develops in around 5-8 days.

Harmonia Beetle Pupa

Egg

Their eggs are distinct from most other insect eggs, except for a few leaf beetle species. They typically are yellowish or orange-red and shaped like spindles. But before hatching, the eggs take on a grey color. Generally, these beetles’ eggs are laid in clusters on the leaves of the preferred host plant.  

Harmonia Beetle Eggs

Quick Facts

Lifespan1-3 months
DistributionNative: Asia, including Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Indonesia, India, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan; Australasia, including Australia, Micronesia, New Guinea, and New Zealand; Europe Invasive: America and parts of Europe
HabitatAgrarian land, cities, gardens, and fields
PredatorsSpiders, some birds
Seasons activeYear-round
Host PlantsAny suitable plant with green leaves
Diet of adultsMainly aphids, but also other insects and their larvae and eggs. Sometimes their diets are supplemented with pollen, nectar, and fruit

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

The harmonia beetles cause no identifiable damage. On the contrary, by preying upon aphids and other insects, they keep plants safe.

Harmonia Beetle Image

Did You Know

  • Sometimes these beetles are sold as biological pest control; however, they tend to not remain in one location for very long. An alternative has been to attract them by keeping plants that provide pollen and nectar.

Image Source: static.inaturalist.org, live.staticflickr.com, americaninsects.net, i.pinimg.com, bugguide.net, nathistoc.bio.uci.edu

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