Home / Scarab Beetles (Scarabaeidae) / Ten-lined June Beetle (Polyphylla decemlineata)

Ten-lined June Beetle (Polyphylla decemlineata)

Ten-lined June beetle of the scarab beetles family is primarily identified by the ten white prominent lines on their wing covers, which also results in their name. These beetles are indigenous to the western parts of the United States as well as Canada.

Ten Lined June Beetle

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Scarabaeidae
  • Genus: Polyphylla
  • Scientific name: Polyphylla decemlineata

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 38.1 mm (1.5 inches)

Color: They have a brownish-black body, with four long and a short stripe located on each col3 of their wing covers or elytra. The bottom part of their thorax has brown hairs.

Other Characteristic Features: Both the sexes appear large. The males have bigger antennae than their female counterparts with many plate-like structures. 

Female Ten Lined June Beetle
Watermelon Beetle

Larva

The larva has a white body and brown head. They grow to about 50.8 mm (2 inches). 

Ten Lined June Beetle Larvae

Pupa

The larval stage goes through three instars, after which, in the following spring, they transition into the pupal phase.

Egg

The eggs have a creamy, oval appearance, growing to 27 mm (1.06 inches) long.

Quick Facts

Other NamesWatermelon beetle, hissing beetle
Adult lifespanNot recorded
Duration of larval stage4 years
DistributionWestern United States, Canada
HabitatOrchards, garden
Common PredatorsBirds, and toads
Seasons active fromMarch – July
Host PlantsStrawberry, potato, rose, corn, cane fruit, poplar, willow
Diet of larvae and adultsLarvae: Roots
Adults: Foliage  
Polyphylla decemlineata

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

The larva damages the roots while the adults feed on the leaves, weakening the plants, even causing them to die.

However, the ten-lined June beetle does not bite or cause any physical harm to humans.

Did You Know

  • They produce a hissing sound similar to a bat when touched or disturbed, thus alternately called hissing beetles.
Ten Lined June Beetle Picture

Image Source: inaturalist-open-data.s3.amazonaws.com, birdspiders.com, bugguide.net, i.pinimg.com

Ten-lined June beetle of the scarab beetles family is primarily identified by the ten white prominent lines on their wing covers, which also results in their name. These beetles are indigenous to the western parts of the United States as well as Canada.

Ten Lined June Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 38.1 mm (1.5 inches)

Color: They have a brownish-black body, with four long and a short stripe located on each col3 of their wing covers or elytra. The bottom part of their thorax has brown hairs.

Other Characteristic Features: Both the sexes appear large. The males have bigger antennae than their female counterparts with many plate-like structures. 

Female Ten Lined June Beetle
Watermelon Beetle

Larva

The larva has a white body and brown head. They grow to about 50.8 mm (2 inches). 

Ten Lined June Beetle Larvae

Pupa

The larval stage goes through three instars, after which, in the following spring, they transition into the pupal phase.

Egg

The eggs have a creamy, oval appearance, growing to 27 mm (1.06 inches) long.

Quick Facts

Other NamesWatermelon beetle, hissing beetle
Adult lifespanNot recorded
Duration of larval stage4 years
DistributionWestern United States, Canada
HabitatOrchards, garden
Common PredatorsBirds, and toads
Seasons active fromMarch – July
Host PlantsStrawberry, potato, rose, corn, cane fruit, poplar, willow
Diet of larvae and adultsLarvae: Roots
Adults: Foliage  
Polyphylla decemlineata

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

The larva damages the roots while the adults feed on the leaves, weakening the plants, even causing them to die.

However, the ten-lined June beetle does not bite or cause any physical harm to humans.

Did You Know

  • They produce a hissing sound similar to a bat when touched or disturbed, thus alternately called hissing beetles.
Ten Lined June Beetle Picture

Image Source: inaturalist-open-data.s3.amazonaws.com, birdspiders.com, bugguide.net, i.pinimg.com

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