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Green June Beetle (Cotinis nitida)

The green June beetle is a scarab beetle found in North America, especially Canada and the United States. The adults are known for attacking various fruits, especially overripe ones.

Green June Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adult 

Size: 1.5-2.2 cm

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Scarabaeidae
  • Genus: Cotinis
  • Scientific name: Cotinis nitida

Color: These beetles have metallic-green wings, golden heads, and col3s, and their undercol3 and legs are bright green.

Other Characteristic Features: It is sometimes mistaken for the figeater beetle with which it has some physical similarities.

Cotinis nitida

Larva

The larvae are white with a brownish-black head and brown spiracles running along its body. When they mature, they may show a bluish or greenish tinge near the head and tail. They possess bristles on their abdomen, which assist in locomotion. Larvae tend to move on their back and are one of the fastest scarab beetles when moving underground. They grow to about 4 cm.

Green June Beetle Larvae

Pupa

After the third larval stage, pupation occurs in a cocoon of dirt particles held together by a sticky fluid secreted by the larva. The pupa is initially white, gaining greenish tints before emerging.

Green June Beetle Pupa

Egg

The eggs are white and initially elliptical, becoming spherical over time. They take an average of 18 days to hatch.

Quick Facts

Other namesJune bug, June beetle
LifespanLess than a year
Distribution The eastern United States and Canada
HabitatThese beetles prefer places with a lot of soil
PredatorsAmerican crows, blue jays, chipmunks, common grackles, digger wasps, friendly flies, gophers, large flesh flies, moles, northern mockingbirds, opossums,  raccoons, and skunks
Seasons activeSummer, especially May-July
Diet of adultsApples, berries, grapes, figs, peaches, pears, and nectarines
Green June Beetle Damage

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

While the larvae primarily feed on humus and mold, the damage they do when they occasionally feed on plant roots, especially those that have been mulched, is more severe than that done by adult beetles.

Adults cause damage to several types of fruits but prefer rotting or already damaged fruits. However, though their feeding damage is not severe, the waste produced by them causes irreparable damage to the fruits they feed on.

Did You Know

  • Swedish zoologist Carl Linnaeus first described this species in 1758.
Green June Beetle Image
Green June Beetle Wings
Green June Beetle Picture

Image Source: pennlive.com, i.pinimg.com, extension.umd.edu, bugwoodcloud.org, cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com, ugaurbanag.com,

The green June beetle is a scarab beetle found in North America, especially Canada and the United States. The adults are known for attacking various fruits, especially overripe ones.

Green June Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adult 

Size: 1.5-2.2 cm

Color: These beetles have metallic-green wings, golden heads, and col3s, and their undercol3 and legs are bright green.

Other Characteristic Features: It is sometimes mistaken for the figeater beetle with which it has some physical similarities.

Cotinis nitida

Larva

The larvae are white with a brownish-black head and brown spiracles running along its body. When they mature, they may show a bluish or greenish tinge near the head and tail. They possess bristles on their abdomen, which assist in locomotion. Larvae tend to move on their back and are one of the fastest scarab beetles when moving underground. They grow to about 4 cm.

Green June Beetle Larvae

Pupa

After the third larval stage, pupation occurs in a cocoon of dirt particles held together by a sticky fluid secreted by the larva. The pupa is initially white, gaining greenish tints before emerging.

Green June Beetle Pupa

Egg

The eggs are white and initially elliptical, becoming spherical over time. They take an average of 18 days to hatch.

Quick Facts

Other namesJune bug, June beetle
LifespanLess than a year
Distribution The eastern United States and Canada
HabitatThese beetles prefer places with a lot of soil
PredatorsAmerican crows, blue jays, chipmunks, common grackles, digger wasps, friendly flies, gophers, large flesh flies, moles, northern mockingbirds, opossums,  raccoons, and skunks
Seasons activeSummer, especially May-July
Diet of adultsApples, berries, grapes, figs, peaches, pears, and nectarines
Green June Beetle Damage

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

While the larvae primarily feed on humus and mold, the damage they do when they occasionally feed on plant roots, especially those that have been mulched, is more severe than that done by adult beetles.

Adults cause damage to several types of fruits but prefer rotting or already damaged fruits. However, though their feeding damage is not severe, the waste produced by them causes irreparable damage to the fruits they feed on.

Did You Know

  • Swedish zoologist Carl Linnaeus first described this species in 1758.
Green June Beetle Image
Green June Beetle Wings
Green June Beetle Picture

Image Source: pennlive.com, i.pinimg.com, extension.umd.edu, bugwoodcloud.org, cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com, ugaurbanag.com,

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