Home / Scarab Beetles (Scarabaeidae) / Grapevine Beetle (Pelidnota punctata)

Grapevine Beetle (Pelidnota punctata)

Grapevine beetle, alternately called the spotted pelidnota or spotted June beetle, belongs to the scarab beetles family. These beetles mainly feed on grapevine leaves and fruits, as evident from their name, but do not damage them immensely.

Grapevine Beetle

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Scarabaeidae
  • Genus: Pelidonta
  • Scientific name: Pelidonta punctata

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 25 – 30 mm (0.98 – 1.18 inches)

Color: They have a unique coloration. The grapevine beetle’s pattern varies from off-yellow to auburn red, alongside four black spots on each side. The edges of their elytra are distinguished prominently by fine black lines.

Other Characteristic Features: The grapevine beetle has two variations, the southern and northern, each varying from the other in some aspects. The north species have darker legs with more spots that appear deep in terms of coloration. The southern species have lighter legs with lesser or no spots at all.

Besides this, in some grapevine beetle species, the color of their legs and elytra match. On the other hand, in a few, the legs are of similar coloration to the lower part of their body.

Spotted Grapevine Beetle

Larva

The c-shaped larvae have a pale appearance, hatching from the eggs in two weeks from being laid. They are white at the onset, with the head changing to dark brown as they mature. The average length to which a larva grows is about 50.8 mm (2 inches). They mostly remain in the soil feeding on rotten wood.

Grapevine Beetle Larvae

Pupa

The pupation phase takes place underground inside pupal chambers constructed by the larvae underground. They appear white in the beginning, initially changing to brown, growing to 2.2 cm.

Grapevine Beetle Pupa

Egg

The oval-shaped eggs are white and elongated, 2mm in length and 1.5 mm in width.  They are laid in tree stumps, rotten wood, or even soil adjacent to their host plant.

Quick Facts

Other NamesSpotted grapevine beetle, spotted pelidnota, spotted June beetle
Adult lifespanAbout 30 days
Duration of larval stage3 – 5 days
DistributionEastern North America, from Ontario up to Maine; and also in parts of Florida, Texas, and South Dakota
HabitatForests, woods, thickets, vineyards, gardens
Common PredatorsRaccoon, blue jay, pallid bat
Seasons active fromJuly – September
Host PlantsGrapevines
Diet of larvae and adults Larvae: Rotten wood
Adults: Leaves and fruits of host plants
Spotted Pelidnota

Identifying the Damage Caused By Them

The adults consume the fruits and leaves of grapevines. They sometimes skeletonizing the foliage by chewing holes into them. However, they are not spotted in large numbers, so it is rarely possible for them to cause damage on a vast scale.

Moreover, they are also not considered poisonous since they don’t bite and do no harm to humans if touched or handled.

Of the several measures to get rid of the beetles, the commonest one includes spraying insecticides.

Did You Know

  • The grapevine beetles are active flyers known to get attracted to lights mostly at night.
Spotted June Beetle

Image Source: cdn.whatsthatbug.com, cirrusimage.com, instagram.fiev22-1.fna.fbcdn.net, sciencesource.com, i.pinimg.com, lh3.googleusercontent.com, live.staticflickr.com

Grapevine beetle, alternately called the spotted pelidnota or spotted June beetle, belongs to the scarab beetles family. These beetles mainly feed on grapevine leaves and fruits, as evident from their name, but do not damage them immensely.

Grapevine Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 25 – 30 mm (0.98 – 1.18 inches)

Color: They have a unique coloration. The grapevine beetle’s pattern varies from off-yellow to auburn red, alongside four black spots on each side. The edges of their elytra are distinguished prominently by fine black lines.

Other Characteristic Features: The grapevine beetle has two variations, the southern and northern, each varying from the other in some aspects. The north species have darker legs with more spots that appear deep in terms of coloration. The southern species have lighter legs with lesser or no spots at all.

Besides this, in some grapevine beetle species, the color of their legs and elytra match. On the other hand, in a few, the legs are of similar coloration to the lower part of their body.

Spotted Grapevine Beetle

Larva

The c-shaped larvae have a pale appearance, hatching from the eggs in two weeks from being laid. They are white at the onset, with the head changing to dark brown as they mature. The average length to which a larva grows is about 50.8 mm (2 inches). They mostly remain in the soil feeding on rotten wood.

Grapevine Beetle Larvae

Pupa

The pupation phase takes place underground inside pupal chambers constructed by the larvae underground. They appear white in the beginning, initially changing to brown, growing to 2.2 cm.

Grapevine Beetle Pupa

Egg

The oval-shaped eggs are white and elongated, 2mm in length and 1.5 mm in width.  They are laid in tree stumps, rotten wood, or even soil adjacent to their host plant.

Quick Facts

Other NamesSpotted grapevine beetle, spotted pelidnota, spotted June beetle
Adult lifespanAbout 30 days
Duration of larval stage3 – 5 days
DistributionEastern North America, from Ontario up to Maine; and also in parts of Florida, Texas, and South Dakota
HabitatForests, woods, thickets, vineyards, gardens
Common PredatorsRaccoon, blue jay, pallid bat
Seasons active fromJuly – September
Host PlantsGrapevines
Diet of larvae and adults Larvae: Rotten wood
Adults: Leaves and fruits of host plants
Spotted Pelidnota

Identifying the Damage Caused By Them

The adults consume the fruits and leaves of grapevines. They sometimes skeletonizing the foliage by chewing holes into them. However, they are not spotted in large numbers, so it is rarely possible for them to cause damage on a vast scale.

Moreover, they are also not considered poisonous since they don’t bite and do no harm to humans if touched or handled.

Of the several measures to get rid of the beetles, the commonest one includes spraying insecticides.

Did You Know

  • The grapevine beetles are active flyers known to get attracted to lights mostly at night.
Spotted June Beetle

Image Source: cdn.whatsthatbug.com, cirrusimage.com, instagram.fiev22-1.fna.fbcdn.net, sciencesource.com, i.pinimg.com, lh3.googleusercontent.com, live.staticflickr.com

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