Home / Cicada Parasite Beetles(Rhipiceridae) / Feather-horned Beetle (Rhipicera femorata)

Feather-horned Beetle (Rhipicera femorata)

Feather-horned beetle of the Rhipiceridae or cedar beetle family is indigenous to different parts of Australia like other members of its genus. Because of its rarity, little details are available about its identification. The beetle’s most striking feature is its feather-like antennae, resulting in its name and making it look increasingly attractive. 

Feather-horned Beetle

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Rhipiceridae
  • Genus: Rhipicera
  • Scientific name: Rhipicera femorata

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 10 – 25 mm (0.39 – 0.98 inches)

Color: They have a grayish-black body with white spots, particularly on their pronotum and elytra formed by hairy patches.

Other Characteristic Features: Their hairy antennae emerge from knob-like structures and have about 20 segments. Males have bigger and more prominent antennae than their female counterparts.

Female Feather Horned Beetle

Larva

The larvae are grub-like and comprise conical antennae divided into a single segment.

Pupa

The pupa has blackish-grey coloration with small horns, closely resembling an adult.

Egg

The eggs are laid near the host plants, though there is no concrete information about their identification.

Quick Facts

Adult lifespanAbout 20 days
Duration of larval stageNot recorded
DistributionSouth-east Australia (southern Australia – Tasmania); south-west Australia
HabitatEucalyptus forests, woodlands
Common PredatorsBirds, wasps, bats
Seasons active fromNot recorded
Host PlantsMostly eucalyptus
Diet of larvae and adults Leaves and roots of the host plant
Rhipicera femorata

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

Since they are an uncommon species, not information is available about the damage they cause to their host plants.

Did You Know

  • The males use their antennae in tracing the female feather-horned beetles emitting pheromones. This trait of the latter is an indication that she is ready for mating.
Feather Horned Beetle Picture

Image Source: featuredcreature.com, live.staticflickr.com, wixmp.com

Feather-horned beetle of the Rhipiceridae or cedar beetle family is indigenous to different parts of Australia like other members of its genus. Because of its rarity, little details are available about its identification. The beetle’s most striking feature is its feather-like antennae, resulting in its name and making it look increasingly attractive. 

Feather-horned Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 10 – 25 mm (0.39 – 0.98 inches)

Color: They have a grayish-black body with white spots, particularly on their pronotum and elytra formed by hairy patches.

Other Characteristic Features: Their hairy antennae emerge from knob-like structures and have about 20 segments. Males have bigger and more prominent antennae than their female counterparts.

Female Feather Horned Beetle

Larva

The larvae are grub-like and comprise conical antennae divided into a single segment.

Pupa

The pupa has blackish-grey coloration with small horns, closely resembling an adult.

Egg

The eggs are laid near the host plants, though there is no concrete information about their identification.

Quick Facts

Adult lifespanAbout 20 days
Duration of larval stageNot recorded
DistributionSouth-east Australia (southern Australia – Tasmania); south-west Australia
HabitatEucalyptus forests, woodlands
Common PredatorsBirds, wasps, bats
Seasons active fromNot recorded
Host PlantsMostly eucalyptus
Diet of larvae and adults Leaves and roots of the host plant
Rhipicera femorata

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

Since they are an uncommon species, not information is available about the damage they cause to their host plants.

Did You Know

  • The males use their antennae in tracing the female feather-horned beetles emitting pheromones. This trait of the latter is an indication that she is ready for mating.
Feather Horned Beetle Picture

Image Source: featuredcreature.com, live.staticflickr.com, wixmp.com

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