Home / Scarab Beetles (Scarabaeidae) / Bumble Flower Beetle (Euphoria inda)

Bumble Flower Beetle (Euphoria inda)

Bumble flower beetle of the scarab beetle family is indigenous to different parts of North America. These beetles make a buzzing sound as they move around flowers that gives them their name.

Bumble Flower Beetle

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Scarabaeidae
  • Genus: Euphoria
  • Scientific name: Euphoria inda

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 12.70 – 15.24 mm (0.5 – 0.6 inches)

Color: They have a yellowish-brown or reddish-brown body with tiny black spots arranged irregularly.

Other Characteristic Features : They appear broad with an oval-shaped body.

Euphoria inda

Larva

The white larvae resemble the grubs of June beetles. Besides roots and shrubs, they even feed on decayed organic matter, and plants decomposed in the soil, thus contributing towards its fertility.

Bumble Flower Beetle Larva

Pupa

Upon maturation, the larvae make small chambers in the soil where the pupation phase takes place.

Egg

The small, round eggs are mostly laid in areas of decayed organic matter.

Quick Facts

Adult lifespanApproximately 6 months  
Duration of larval stageNot recorded
DistributionDifferent parts of North America
HabitatGardens and grasslands
Common PredatorsBirds, wasps, bats
Seasons active fromJune – September
Host PlantsSunflower, thistle, strawflower, daylily, grapes, peaches, melons, apples, alongside corn, apples, melons, peaches, grapes  
Diet of larvae and adultsLarvae: Dead and decayed plant matter, alongside roots and shrubs
Adults : Pollen, nectar, juice, the sap of flowers, and even overripe fruits like peaches, grapes, apples, pears

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

Since the adults mostly feed on the saps and juices, they result in cracks in fruits and even vegetables like tomatoes causing them to ripen prematurely.

Bumble Flower Beetle Damage

Did You Know

  • Its species name was first described by Swedish botanist Carl Linneaus in 1758.
Bumble Flower Beetle Picture

Image Source: arthurevans.files.wordpress.com, i.pinimg.com, bugwoodcloud.org, hortnews.extension.iastate.edu, thebigwoodentent.files.wordpress.com

Bumble flower beetle of the scarab beetle family is indigenous to different parts of North America. These beetles make a buzzing sound as they move around flowers that gives them their name.

Bumble Flower Beetle

Physical Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 12.70 – 15.24 mm (0.5 – 0.6 inches)

Color: They have a yellowish-brown or reddish-brown body with tiny black spots arranged irregularly.

Other Characteristic Features : They appear broad with an oval-shaped body.

Euphoria inda

Larva

The white larvae resemble the grubs of June beetles. Besides roots and shrubs, they even feed on decayed organic matter, and plants decomposed in the soil, thus contributing towards its fertility.

Bumble Flower Beetle Larva

Pupa

Upon maturation, the larvae make small chambers in the soil where the pupation phase takes place.

Egg

The small, round eggs are mostly laid in areas of decayed organic matter.

Quick Facts

Adult lifespanApproximately 6 months  
Duration of larval stageNot recorded
DistributionDifferent parts of North America
HabitatGardens and grasslands
Common PredatorsBirds, wasps, bats
Seasons active fromJune – September
Host PlantsSunflower, thistle, strawflower, daylily, grapes, peaches, melons, apples, alongside corn, apples, melons, peaches, grapes  
Diet of larvae and adultsLarvae: Dead and decayed plant matter, alongside roots and shrubs
Adults : Pollen, nectar, juice, the sap of flowers, and even overripe fruits like peaches, grapes, apples, pears

Identifying the Damage Caused by Them

Since the adults mostly feed on the saps and juices, they result in cracks in fruits and even vegetables like tomatoes causing them to ripen prematurely.

Bumble Flower Beetle Damage

Did You Know

  • Its species name was first described by Swedish botanist Carl Linneaus in 1758.
Bumble Flower Beetle Picture

Image Source: arthurevans.files.wordpress.com, i.pinimg.com, bugwoodcloud.org, hortnews.extension.iastate.edu, thebigwoodentent.files.wordpress.com

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