Home / Leaf Beetles (Chrysomelidae) / Blue Milkweed Beetle (Chrysochus cobaltinus)

Blue Milkweed Beetle (Chrysochus cobaltinus)

Blue milkweed beetle of the leaf beetle family is indigenous to the western United States, and parts of British Columbia. The bright cobalt blue coloration of these beetles has resulted in their name.

Blue Milkweed Beetle

Scientific Classification

  • Family: Chrysomelidae
  • Genus: Chrysochus
  • Scientific name: Chrysochus cobaltinus

Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 6 – 9 mm (0.24 – 0.inches)

Color: They have a bright cobalt blue appearance.

Other Characteristic Features: One of their distinctive features is their clubbed antenna and an oval body.

Chrysochus cobaltinus

Caterpillar

No detail remains available regarding the identification of the blue milkweed beetle species. However, they mainly feed on the leaf tissues and roots of milkweed plants resulting in immense damage.

Pupa

The pupation phase occurs near the milkweed leaves where the larva inhabits.

Egg

The eggs appear small and round, mostly laid on the milkweed plant’s leaves.

Quick Facts

Other NamesCobalt milkweed beetle
Adult lifespanAbout six weeks
Duration of larval stageNot recorded
DistributionBritish Columbia to parts of Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, California, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona
HabitatGrasslands, railroads, roadside, and in places where the host plants grow
Common PredatorsBirds, wasps
Seasons active fromNot recorded
Host PlantsMilkweed
Diet of larvae and adultsLarvae: Leaf tissues and roots
Adults: Leaves and flowers of milkweed plants
Blue Milkweed Beetle Picture

Identifying the Damage Caused By Them

The adult blue milkweed beetle chews the leaves, making holes in them. On the other hand, the larvae consume the leaf tissues and veins, skeletonizing the leaves to the fullest. Since the caterpillars feed on the roots also, they cause overall damage to the plants causing them to wither.

Did You Know

  • American entomologist LeConte first described this species in 1857.
Blue Milkweed Beetle Image

Image Source: storage.needpix.com, lh3.googleusercontent.com, bugguide.net, lh6.ggpht.com

Blue milkweed beetle of the leaf beetle family is indigenous to the western United States, and parts of British Columbia. The bright cobalt blue coloration of these beetles has resulted in their name.

Blue Milkweed Beetle

Description and Identification

Adult

Size: 6 – 9 mm (0.24 – 0.inches)

Color: They have a bright cobalt blue appearance.

Other Characteristic Features: One of their distinctive features is their clubbed antenna and an oval body.

Chrysochus cobaltinus

Caterpillar

No detail remains available regarding the identification of the blue milkweed beetle species. However, they mainly feed on the leaf tissues and roots of milkweed plants resulting in immense damage.

Pupa

The pupation phase occurs near the milkweed leaves where the larva inhabits.

Egg

The eggs appear small and round, mostly laid on the milkweed plant’s leaves.

Quick Facts

Other NamesCobalt milkweed beetle
Adult lifespanAbout six weeks
Duration of larval stageNot recorded
DistributionBritish Columbia to parts of Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, California, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona
HabitatGrasslands, railroads, roadside, and in places where the host plants grow
Common PredatorsBirds, wasps
Seasons active fromNot recorded
Host PlantsMilkweed
Diet of larvae and adultsLarvae: Leaf tissues and roots
Adults: Leaves and flowers of milkweed plants
Blue Milkweed Beetle Picture

Identifying the Damage Caused By Them

The adult blue milkweed beetle chews the leaves, making holes in them. On the other hand, the larvae consume the leaf tissues and veins, skeletonizing the leaves to the fullest. Since the caterpillars feed on the roots also, they cause overall damage to the plants causing them to wither.

Did You Know

  • American entomologist LeConte first described this species in 1857.
Blue Milkweed Beetle Image

Image Source: storage.needpix.com, lh3.googleusercontent.com, bugguide.net, lh6.ggpht.com

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